|Practical case|

TELE-PRESENT WATER – DAVID BOWEN

2011 • COMPUTER AND NETWORK-BASED SCULPTURE

 

This installation draws information from the intensity and movement of the water in a remote location. Wave data is being collected and updated from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data buoy station 51003. This station was originally moored 205 nautical miles Southwest of Honolulu on the Pacific. It went adrift and the last report from its moored position was around 04/25/2011. It is still transmitting valid observation data but its exact location is unknown. The wave intensity and frequency collected from the buoy is scaled and transferred to the mechanical matrix structure, resulting in a simulation of the physical effects caused by the movement of water from this distant unknown location. This work physically replicates a remote experience and makes observation of the activity of an isolated object, otherwise lost at sea, possible through direct communication.

Treatments/actions (in collaboration with Marc Schütze):

. Documentation

. On the 26. July 2019 Tele-present Water has been removed from the exhibition because one of the servos wiggled itself out of the mounting. Hopefully, no further damages were caused.
. Communication with the artist

. After decision-making with the technical and restoration teams, we did not reposition the motor inside the structure. Instead, the structure has been improved to make it stronger/exhibition-proof (and resist such a long exhibitions: 3 years in the case of the collection's exhibition).

New 3D-printed holders for each motor were created as well as a new aluminum structure in close cooperation with David Bowen.

We made major changes:

  1. the motors are not hold within two metal stems anymore but individually hold in 3D-printed holders.

  2. the holders are then through-screwed in a U aluminum profile.

  3. the new shape allows an easier manipulation of the motor in order to be able to change one motor at a time.

. Assembly of the new structure

. Reinstallation in exhibition space